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10 Things to Consider When Looking at a Potential New Role

We have all been guilty of it - we look for a new role when it's the 'last straw' at the company we are working for. You dread going into work and you need a role where it makes you feel alive.

We all too often start a role before asking all the right questions. As we know, people leave managers not companies. You can work in a great department in one company, have an understanding and supportive hiring manager, and have another department in the same company with high attrition levels where everyone is unhappy.

You want to be in the category where you are happy and your direct manager looks after you, gives you what you need as well as you working hard to ensure you do what is required. It is a two way relationship after all.

Questions we completely forget to even ask when someone approaches us about a job, or indeed call us back after making an application are probably the most important. You have the job description, but what does the company actually want in someone?

You need to be happy in your job and finding out whether this is the right role for you is so important. Do not let the stress of finding a new role, allow you to overlook the most important details of the role.

Checklist for those that are looking for a new role and not sure where to start. This is information that you should look for, you should have a detailed job description already. These can be asked at interview stage or even at the initial stages.

  • What is the environment/culture like?
  • What are the company's values?
  • If this is a role where you can make some big changes, what are the processes for any change requests? Does it take 6 weeks to get sign off for a process change or 6 days?
  • What does the manager expect from you as an employee?
  • Are there any changes happening that you need to be made aware of?
  • What does a typical day look like? - this gives you an idea of how much time is spent on certain duties. For example travel etc.
  • If you are looking for a role where you want to develop - what can the company provide you with?
  • Why did the last person leave (if this is a back fill) - if for development reasons and you are looking for development, is this the right role for you?
  • Career path within the company, what does it look like? Can they give examples of employees being progressed throughout the company.
  • Is there a mentoring programme available. Some companies have mentors that dedicate part of their time away from their daily duties to help mentor others.  

During interview stage if you are one of those that are measured on output, what are they hoping to achieve? Is it something that you know you can do, or are the figures they have completely unrealistic?

Please note, not all the above may be relevant for you, so pick the questions that most resonate with what you want in your next role.

Take control of the situation and ask the questions that are most important to you. If you are unsure of something, ask in the interview. After all, is it not better to find out during the process than after and find it is the completely wrong environment for you?

Download this guide

10 Things to Consider When Looking at a Potential New Role

We have all been guilty of it - we look for a new role when it's the 'last straw' at the company we are working for. You dread going into work and you need a role where it makes you feel alive.

We all too often start a role before asking all the right questions. As we know, people leave managers not companies. You can work in a great department in one company, have an understanding and supportive hiring manager, and have another department in the same company with high attrition levels where everyone is unhappy.

You want to be in the category where you are happy and your direct manager looks after you, gives you what you need as well as you working hard to ensure you do what is required. It is a two way relationship after all.

Questions we completely forget to even ask when someone approaches us about a job, or indeed call us back after making an application are probably the most important. You have the job description, but what does the company actually want in someone?

You need to be happy in your job and finding out whether this is the right role for you is so important. Do not let the stress of finding a new role, allow you to overlook the most important details of the role.

Checklist for those that are looking for a new role and not sure where to start. This is information that you should look for, you should have a detailed job description already. These can be asked at interview stage or even at the initial stages.

  • What is the environment/culture like?
  • What are the company's values?
  • If this is a role where you can make some big changes, what are the processes for any change requests? Does it take 6 weeks to get sign off for a process change or 6 days?
  • What does the manager expect from you as an employee?
  • Are there any changes happening that you need to be made aware of?
  • What does a typical day look like? - this gives you an idea of how much time is spent on certain duties. For example travel etc.
  • If you are looking for a role where you want to develop - what can the company provide you with?
  • Why did the last person leave (if this is a back fill) - if for development reasons and you are looking for development, is this the right role for you?
  • Career path within the company, what does it look like? Can they give examples of employees being progressed throughout the company.
  • Is there a mentoring programme available. Some companies have mentors that dedicate part of their time away from their daily duties to help mentor others.  

During interview stage if you are one of those that are measured on output, what are they hoping to achieve? Is it something that you know you can do, or are the figures they have completely unrealistic?

Please note, not all the above may be relevant for you, so pick the questions that most resonate with what you want in your next role.

Take control of the situation and ask the questions that are most important to you. If you are unsure of something, ask in the interview. After all, is it not better to find out during the process than after and find it is the completely wrong environment for you?

Download this guide