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How do I write a CV for the engineering industry? Take time during COVID-19 to work on it.

If you are looking for a new role in the Engineering, there are things you need to really think about. Writing a CV believe it or not can be difficult. You will probably have to change it for every role you are applying for. Do not use one CV for every job role.

First things first - Do your research on the company you are applying for

  • Look at their website - what do they do, how long have they been around, where are they based
  • Visit the hiring managers linkedin page, and the team, look at where they have come from (companies they have worked for prior to their current one)
  • Look at glassdoor to see what kind of reviews they have
  • What are the company values?

Recruiters (if you have a good one) will work with you to ensure your CV is what the client is looking for. You might well have all the experience that the client wants, but as we know, clients like to see it on a piece of paper. Not all! Just some.

This does not mean add in experience you have not had, they will find out during interview stage and it will backfire. Be open and honest.


Format of a CV

Font:  Ariel, Calibri

Size:  11pt

Name

Location – where you want to work or are happy to work. List the details in your CV.

Contact number – make sure it’s right (triple check it)

Email address (again, check this is right)


Summary

This should really tell the person your experience in relation to the role you are applying for. Sell yourself in this space – I promise you it will make a huge difference. Certifications is a big one, you can mention these here too, the standards you have worked to and whether you hold any special documentation (e.g Form 4 holder)


A snapshot of your achievements

You can list them in order of importance for each role you apply for.

If you are a CMM Inspector - think about what you were doing in the role. What systems and software were you working with? What kind of physical objects were you handling? Were these objects a nice round shape or were were they a more difficult shape to measure? This will give the recruiter/hiring manager an idea on whether you are right for the role. If what they require measuring is of a shape that is not your typical 'clean' shape then you may struggle without support if you have not done this before. For a contract role, this is probably not going to be the right role, but for a permanent person, they may be willing to consider you. Talk about if you have shaddowed others in the team who have done this, it shows you have knowledge and can refer to this.

Format of achievements

  • What you achieved
  • How you achieved it
  • What time frame
  • What it meant for the company.

Career History

Dates – Company – Role carried out

So important (pay attention) that you realise this is not a job spec. No one wants to see a list of duties that were pulled from a spec, or look like they were pulled from a spec.

For every point that you refer to under each role, make sure you stick to the following:

  • What you achieved (% or £)
  • How you achieved it - who did you work with, what was your involvement
  • What time frame
  • What it meant for the company/department
  • Systems used, what measuring tools have you used? What software experience do you have from this role?
  • What else did you do that was not part of your 'day job'

You will think to yourself, this is going to make my CV longer and if it does, who cares? This is your only chance to sell yourself for this position without speaking with someone. Detail is EVERYTHING.  It will require you to cut out the stuff you do not need to put in. It will actually provide the reader with a story of what you have achieved. Much better than a list of things that does not really mean much.


Education and Qualifications

· Where and when (dates) did you study?

· What did you study?

· What was your result?

  • Where and when (dates) did you study?
  • What did you study?
  • What was your result?

Interests

I always say to candidates, do not be generic with this. What do you actually enjoy doing? Do you teach a small football team in your spare time, under 10’s? Do you volunteer in your spare time?  This is about you, and they do not get a chance to speak with you, they see your CV. So let your personality shine through.

These will be conversation starters and you will stick out from the rest of them that say – I like to stay fit and go to the gym. If you go to the gym – what do you do? Weight lifting? Have you hit your PB? Put it in here! Ran 5k in your best time – amazing! Play badminton against others and won some games? Again, add it to your interests.

We want everyone to know that writing a CV is not easy. If you want to have a chat with us. Give us a call. 02477 395 959.

Download this guide

How do I write a CV for the engineering industry? Take time during COVID-19 to work on it.

If you are looking for a new role in the Engineering, there are things you need to really think about. Writing a CV believe it or not can be difficult. You will probably have to change it for every role you are applying for. Do not use one CV for every job role.

First things first - Do your research on the company you are applying for

  • Look at their website - what do they do, how long have they been around, where are they based
  • Visit the hiring managers linkedin page, and the team, look at where they have come from (companies they have worked for prior to their current one)
  • Look at glassdoor to see what kind of reviews they have
  • What are the company values?

Recruiters (if you have a good one) will work with you to ensure your CV is what the client is looking for. You might well have all the experience that the client wants, but as we know, clients like to see it on a piece of paper. Not all! Just some.

This does not mean add in experience you have not had, they will find out during interview stage and it will backfire. Be open and honest.


Format of a CV

Font:  Ariel, Calibri

Size:  11pt

Name

Location – where you want to work or are happy to work. List the details in your CV.

Contact number – make sure it’s right (triple check it)

Email address (again, check this is right)


Summary

This should really tell the person your experience in relation to the role you are applying for. Sell yourself in this space – I promise you it will make a huge difference. Certifications is a big one, you can mention these here too, the standards you have worked to and whether you hold any special documentation (e.g Form 4 holder)


A snapshot of your achievements

You can list them in order of importance for each role you apply for.

If you are a CMM Inspector - think about what you were doing in the role. What systems and software were you working with? What kind of physical objects were you handling? Were these objects a nice round shape or were were they a more difficult shape to measure? This will give the recruiter/hiring manager an idea on whether you are right for the role. If what they require measuring is of a shape that is not your typical 'clean' shape then you may struggle without support if you have not done this before. For a contract role, this is probably not going to be the right role, but for a permanent person, they may be willing to consider you. Talk about if you have shaddowed others in the team who have done this, it shows you have knowledge and can refer to this.

Format of achievements

  • What you achieved
  • How you achieved it
  • What time frame
  • What it meant for the company.

Career History

Dates – Company – Role carried out

So important (pay attention) that you realise this is not a job spec. No one wants to see a list of duties that were pulled from a spec, or look like they were pulled from a spec.

For every point that you refer to under each role, make sure you stick to the following:

  • What you achieved (% or £)
  • How you achieved it - who did you work with, what was your involvement
  • What time frame
  • What it meant for the company/department
  • Systems used, what measuring tools have you used? What software experience do you have from this role?
  • What else did you do that was not part of your 'day job'

You will think to yourself, this is going to make my CV longer and if it does, who cares? This is your only chance to sell yourself for this position without speaking with someone. Detail is EVERYTHING.  It will require you to cut out the stuff you do not need to put in. It will actually provide the reader with a story of what you have achieved. Much better than a list of things that does not really mean much.


Education and Qualifications

· Where and when (dates) did you study?

· What did you study?

· What was your result?

  • Where and when (dates) did you study?
  • What did you study?
  • What was your result?

Interests

I always say to candidates, do not be generic with this. What do you actually enjoy doing? Do you teach a small football team in your spare time, under 10’s? Do you volunteer in your spare time?  This is about you, and they do not get a chance to speak with you, they see your CV. So let your personality shine through.

These will be conversation starters and you will stick out from the rest of them that say – I like to stay fit and go to the gym. If you go to the gym – what do you do? Weight lifting? Have you hit your PB? Put it in here! Ran 5k in your best time – amazing! Play badminton against others and won some games? Again, add it to your interests.

We want everyone to know that writing a CV is not easy. If you want to have a chat with us. Give us a call. 02477 395 959.

Download this guide