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Reducing Time to Hire - 5 Tips!

Something many of my clients had in common lead me to put this little information pack together. One thing that becomes frustrating is time to hire. You need to hire people, but you do not have the time right now to spend looking at CVs and interviewing. Sound familiar?

These 5 tips will help you get more organised and in return – time to hire reduces dramatically.


1) Plan ahead – if you know come April you need someone in the business, and its February, you are already behind in your recruitment. To be organised, you need to take into account notice periods of candidates, this can be up to 3 months, depending on the seniority of the role you are recruiting for.

If you are hiring someone on 4 weeks notice and you need someone in on 1st April – you should have started your recruitment mid January. If your processes internally take time to get a new role approved, take this into account. You need to work backwards – less stress all round.

2) Be concise about what it is you are looking for. Ensure you have measurables for this person in place prior to going out to market. How else are you going to ensure they are right for the role?

A job spec is not enough, in depth detail is required to find the right people. Communication is KEY! Ensure a thorough screening is conducted.

  • Why do the talent team or the agencies think this is a good hire for you?
  • What have they done in their career?
  • What have they achieved where you may also be looking for similar successes?


3) Put time aside in your diary for reviewing CVs – it is in your diary and it should be a priority. Think about time lost and money lost for this one hire not to be in the business in time. This should be done before going out to market, adverts or sourcing directly. Looking at 40 CV's for one job role (Yes, I kid you not, one of my current Clients who had the role of HR Manager was managing the role with 4 agencies in total) is not saving time - 5 CVs at a maximum is what you should be looking at (1HR MAX reviewing CVs).


4) Pin point dates for interviews

  • When are you available?
  • When do you want to interview?
  • Who else is going to be involved?

Get this right from the start. If there is more than one key decision maker, or you know you would like someone to meet a candidate before you make a final decision (maximum of 2 other people), ensure diaries are aligned throughout all key milestones in the recruitment process. If this is done right, candidates will be more engaged and in return less fall out during the interview/offer stage.


5) Give feedback! There is nothing worse than a candidate coming for an interview, with no feedback provided. A no is still bad feedback, use the notes from the interview to be specific. Top 5 things you liked about them, and then areas of development/where they lacked knowledge.

In 6 months’ time you might be hiring again and think one of your previous candidates you interviewed were perfect. Easy fill if you gave them a great impression of the business and its values during the interview and after, especially if they are looking and were keen on the company as well as the role.

If you do anything, spend time in the initial stages of recruitment to get the key milestones identified along with your specific requirements and your time to hire will dramatically reduce.

Download this guide

Reducing Time to Hire - 5 Tips!

Something many of my clients had in common lead me to put this little information pack together. One thing that becomes frustrating is time to hire. You need to hire people, but you do not have the time right now to spend looking at CVs and interviewing. Sound familiar?

These 5 tips will help you get more organised and in return – time to hire reduces dramatically.


1) Plan ahead – if you know come April you need someone in the business, and its February, you are already behind in your recruitment. To be organised, you need to take into account notice periods of candidates, this can be up to 3 months, depending on the seniority of the role you are recruiting for.

If you are hiring someone on 4 weeks notice and you need someone in on 1st April – you should have started your recruitment mid January. If your processes internally take time to get a new role approved, take this into account. You need to work backwards – less stress all round.

2) Be concise about what it is you are looking for. Ensure you have measurables for this person in place prior to going out to market. How else are you going to ensure they are right for the role?

A job spec is not enough, in depth detail is required to find the right people. Communication is KEY! Ensure a thorough screening is conducted.

  • Why do the talent team or the agencies think this is a good hire for you?
  • What have they done in their career?
  • What have they achieved where you may also be looking for similar successes?


3) Put time aside in your diary for reviewing CVs – it is in your diary and it should be a priority. Think about time lost and money lost for this one hire not to be in the business in time. This should be done before going out to market, adverts or sourcing directly. Looking at 40 CV's for one job role (Yes, I kid you not, one of my current Clients who had the role of HR Manager was managing the role with 4 agencies in total) is not saving time - 5 CVs at a maximum is what you should be looking at (1HR MAX reviewing CVs).


4) Pin point dates for interviews

  • When are you available?
  • When do you want to interview?
  • Who else is going to be involved?

Get this right from the start. If there is more than one key decision maker, or you know you would like someone to meet a candidate before you make a final decision (maximum of 2 other people), ensure diaries are aligned throughout all key milestones in the recruitment process. If this is done right, candidates will be more engaged and in return less fall out during the interview/offer stage.


5) Give feedback! There is nothing worse than a candidate coming for an interview, with no feedback provided. A no is still bad feedback, use the notes from the interview to be specific. Top 5 things you liked about them, and then areas of development/where they lacked knowledge.

In 6 months’ time you might be hiring again and think one of your previous candidates you interviewed were perfect. Easy fill if you gave them a great impression of the business and its values during the interview and after, especially if they are looking and were keen on the company as well as the role.

If you do anything, spend time in the initial stages of recruitment to get the key milestones identified along with your specific requirements and your time to hire will dramatically reduce.

Download this guide